Sunday, 28 May 2017

All creative process is valuable

Since I am quite literally the most motivational guy despite having no real achievements of my own, I'm here to talk to you about the merits of every creative venture you try.


Let's start by discussing the phrase, "I am inherently bad at X", where X might be any activity- maths, writing, game development, whatever you want it to be. This phrase indicates that no matter what you do, you will always be worse than other people at that activity.

First of all, of course you will be. There is only one person in the entire world who is not worse than at least one other person. You can make the argument "oh, but I'd be worse than the average person doing X" but that is also flawed, given my next point.

My next point is that a lot of these activities simply cannot be quantified. For instance, it's physically impossible to designate one standard as being the "average" quality of a painting. You might be doing things which are characteristic of people who are "bad" at it, but if that really concerns you, just put in some time to learn how to not do that. Needless to say, it's a very silly idea to suggest that you somehow inherently possess an inability to improve.

This brings me to my third point. You can improve. You can practise. Each time you try to do something, you will get better. If you're concerned about the pace at which you're improving, you can seek out resources to help you learn faster.

In order to make something good, you need to make a lot more things which are bad. It's no lie that a lot of people learn best from making mistakes. Besides, when you make something which a lot of people consider to be good, you will over time find more and more flaws with it.

If you've just finished a game and you feel great about it, give it a week. You'll start to find flaws with it. You'll continuously be finding more and more flaws, both as you grow more familiar with that piece in particular and as your abilities improve. In a year or two, you'll look back on that and wonder how certain details ever slipped past you.

Of course, to your audience your game never degraded in quality. As new people find it, they will be seeing it for the first time. They won't be familiar enough with your game to see all the flaws which are so glaring to you. You will have created something which people can enjoy- even if you no longer do.

I believe this process translates to other media. At least, in my experience. Hell, I even regret making a certain video which I made only 2 and a half months ago.

But that doesn't matter, because I've made something. It's important to make something even if you don't think you're good at it, because it's another stepping stone on your journey to actually being good. Even if you think it will take you nowhere, just make it and damn the consequences.

Either way, thanks for reading and stay tuned for some more stuff related to game development, tangentially or otherwise.

No comments :

Post a Comment